Resolution 2014.03 Flavoured Tobacco Products Ban

August 15, 2014

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2014.03 Flavoured Tobacco Products Ban

Whereas, Tobacco, and therefore flavoured tobacco products, are addictive and dangerous to health; and

Whereas, New forms of flavoured tobacco products that mimic fruit and candy are attractive to younger consumers; therefore, be it

Resolved, That national council of The Catholic Women’s League of Canada, in 94th annual national convention assembled, urge the federal government to ban the production and import of flavoured tobacco products; and, be it further

Resolved, That national council of The Catholic Women’s League of Canada, in 94th annual national convention assembled, encourage provincial councils to become aware of the issue of flavoured tobacco products as it pertains to their province/territory, and to act on it, as deemed necessary/prudent.

BRIEF:          Flavoured Tobacco Products Ban

Tobacco and tobacco products have long been known to be addictive and dangerous to human health(U.S. Department of Health & Human Services). In recent years, new tobacco products are being manufactured – characterized as “flavoured tobacco products.” These are still tobacco, masked in new forms that mimic fruit and candy and that are attractive to younger consumers (i.e. children) (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). Cigarillos, chewing tobacco (“spit” or “smokeless” tobacco), and water pipe tobacco (sheesha pipes) are now available in flavours of chocolate, strawberry, vanilla, mint, cherry, apple, peach, grape, menthol, etc., specifically to target the young demographic (Judd). These addictive candy-like products are now expanded to include twist sticks, dissolvable strips and lozenges that can contain three times more nicotine than a cigarette (Leslie).

The Canadian Cancer Society reports that, “[since] the introduction of fruit-flavoured and candy-flavoured cigarillos, there has been a significant increase in the number of youth trying these and other flavoured products.” Flavoured cigarillos are being sold individually, wrapped to resemble lip gloss or marker pens, for a loonie or a toonie at convenience stores, attracting young people and making it easy to purchase them (Canadian Cancer Society – Saskatchewan). A national Youth Smoking Survey (Judd, U Waterloo Propel Centre) found that, of youth tobacco users in British Columbia, over half used flavoured products.

In some provinces, legislation has been adopted to prevent the sale of flavoured tobacco products to youth (Legislative Assembly of Alberta). Citizens in other provinces (e.g. British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Ontario) are encouraging their provincial legislatures to implement similar controls (Judd; Leslie; Silva; Sudbury). Currently (Dec. 2013), federal legislation only bans flavours, not including menthol, in cigarettes, little cigars and blunt wraps – smokeless tobacco products are still exempted federally (Minaker). A beneficial next-step would be for the federal government to expand the law to ban the production and import of flavoured tobacco products to reduce the use nation-wide. Such legislation should be even broader than the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act in the United States (U.S. Food and Drug Administration), which bans the making, shipping and selling of certain flavoured cigarettes (only).

The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) has been lobbying for the federal government to enact legislation banning child-friendly flavouring in tobacco products since at least 2008. CMA cited the addictive nature of tobacco and its health hazards in its advocacy campaign (CMA). By extension, banning the production and import of such products federally would reduce the burden on provincial health care resources and law enforcement resources, which are otherwise needed to monitor and enforce legislation that simply regulates the sale of these products.

 

WORKS CITED:

Canadian Cancer Society – Saskatchewan. “Banning flavoured tobacco products.” & “Meet Jianna: the truth about flavoured tobacco.” Web. 22 Mar. 2014.  http://www.cancer.ca/en/get-involved/take-action/what-we-are-doing/tobacco-control/banning-flavoured-tobacco-products-sk/?region=sk

Canadian Medical Association. Year in Review 2008-2009. Web. 22 Mar. 2014.  http://www.cma.ca/multimedia/CMA/Content_Images/Inside_cma/Annual_Meeting/2009/Yearinreview-08-09_en.pdf

Judd, Amy. “British Columbia teens agree: Ban fruit and candy flavoured tobacco.” Global News (21 January 2014). Web. 22 Mar. 2014.  http://globalnews.ca/news/1097072/british-columbia-teens-agree-ban-fruit-and-candy-flavoured-tobacco/

Legislative Assembly of Alberta. Bill 206 Tobacco Reduction (Flavoured Tobacco Products) Amendment Act, 2013. Web. 22 Mar. 22 2014. http://www.assembly.ab.ca/ISYS/LADDAR_files/docs/bills/bill/legislature_28/session_1/20120523_bill-206.pdf

Leslie, Keith. “Ontario introducing bill to ban sale of flavoured-tobacco to youth.” The Star – Queen’s Park (13 November 2013). Web. 22 Mar. 2014. <http://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2013/11/13/ontario_bill_to_ban_sale_of_flavouredtobacco_to_youth.html>

Health Canada (2010). Government of Canada Ban on Flavored Tobacco Products now in Full Force.  July 5, 2010. Retrieved from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/media/nr-cp/_2010/2010_112-eng.php

Health Canada (2009). An Act to Amend the Tobacco Act (2009) Retrieved from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hc-ps/tobac-tabac/legislation/federal/2009_fact-renseignements-eng.php

Minaker, Leia, and Steve Manske. “Opinion: New tobacco laws make Alberta a leader, but more can be done.” Edmonton Journal (6 December 2013). Web. 22 Mar. 2014. http://www.edmontonjournal.com/health/Opinion+tobacco+laws+make+Alberta+leader+more+done/9257349/story.html

Silva, Steve. “Canadian Cancer Society pushes for ban of flavoured tobacco products in Saskatchewan.” Global News (20 January 2014). Web. 22 Mar. 2014. http://globalnews.ca/news/1095644/canadian-cancer-society-pushes-for-ban-of-flavoured-tobacco-products-in-saskatchewan/

Sudbury Northern Lights Staff. “Gélinas pushes for ban on flavoured tobacco products.” Northern Life (20 February 2014). Web. 22 Mar. 2014. http://www.northernlife.ca/news/localNews/2014/02/20-flavoured-tobacco-sudbury.aspx

United States Department of Health & Human Services (2014). BeTobaccoFree.gov. Tobacco and Nicotine Retrieved from http://betobaccofree.hhs.gov/about-tobacco/tobacco-and-nicotine/index.html

United States. Food and Drug Administration. Flavored Tobacco. Web. 22 Mar. 2014. http://www.fda.gov/TobaccoProducts/ProtectingKidsfromTobacco/FlavoredTobacco

U.S. Food and Drug Administration (2009). Overview of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act: Consumer Fact Sheet retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/tobaccoproducts/guidancecomplianceregulatoryinformation/ucm246129.htm

University of Waterloo. Propel Centre for Population Health Impact. Youth Smoking Survey 2012/2013. Web. 22 Mar. 2014.  https://uwaterloo.ca/propel/programs/youth-health/youth-smoking-survey

 

ACTION PLAN

  1.  Write to the prime minister, minister of health and local members of parliament urging the federal government to ban the production and import of flavoured tobacco products.
  2. Write to provincial and territorial governments urging them to regulate the availability and sale, especially to youth, of flavoured tobacco products in their province/territory.
  3. Invite speakers to address concerns about flavoured tobacco products from the perspective of health, law enforcement and legislation at parish council meetings.
  4. Monitor the governments’ responses to the requests contained in the resolution.